EXPLORE HURI

FEATURED NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Ukraine-Related Courses at Harvard, 2018-2019

Students reading Krytyka

Interested in Ukrainian literature? How about the culture of Medieval Rus'? This academic year, Harvard is offering a number of courses that focus on Ukraine.

Students interested in traveling to Ukraine or reading its literature in the original can prepare by taking Dr. Volodymyr Dibrova's language class. Haven't satisfied your language requirement yet? Why not take Ukrainian and stand out from your peers taking Russian or Romance languages?

Students should note that Prof. Serhii Plokhii is on sabbatical, so his history courses on Ukraine will not be on offer this year. We are, however, running the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies, which will span a range of disciplines and topics. As always, check the Harvard Course Catalog for updated information. See the course offerings.

NOW HIRING: Director for HURI's New Contemporary Ukraine Program

Job Opening

Harvard is accepting applications to fill the role of Program Director for the Temerty Contemporary Ukraine Program, Ukrainian Research Institute. The holder of this position is charged with developing and managing a new program on contemporary Ukraine. The goal of the program is to support research on Ukraine’s contemporary foreign policy, domestic government and politics, and sociological and cultural trends of significance, and to serve as a platform for the exchange of ideas about Ukraine between the academic and policy communities.

The program director works with the faculty director and executive director to set a strategy and lead day-to-day management and implementation of the program. The program will encompass research, publications, seminars, and conferences. This position reports to the Executive Director. The official job listing can be found on Harvard's Job Search website. Read more.

Announcing HURI's 2018-2019 Research Fellows

Fall Harvard Feature

HURI is pleased to announce its research fellows for the 2018-2019 academic year.

HURI’s fellowship program offers funding for research in Ukrainian studies at all stages of an academic career. Our fellows conduct research in residence at HURI while making use of the extensive resources at Harvard University, participating in seminars, and connecting with other scholars in the field.

This year, HURI welcomes nine fellows; three in the fall and six in the spring semester. These scholars will examine different aspects of Ukraine, including its history, politics, nationalities, interethnic relations, identities, and early literature. As specialists of several different fields, their perspectives will contribute greatly to our weekly Seminar in Ukrainian Studies. We look forward to learning from them! Read about the fellows.

Shklar and Mihaychuk Fellows 2009–2010



Shklar Fellows

delapuente
Ines Garcia de la Puente received her doctorate in Slavic philology and Indo-European linguistics from the Complutense University, Madrid, in 2006. Garcia will use her fellowship tenure this fall to focus on the topic “From Kyiv to Rome along the Ladoga: Reassessing Trade Routes in Rus´,” a topic that she began researching in 2008 under a postdoctoral fellowship from the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science. She aims to shed new light on the traditional interpretation of the “route from the Varangians to the Greeks” as described in the Primary Chronicle. She plans to conduct a linguistic analysis of the description of the route in the chronicle, completing an intratextual analysis of the Primary Chronicle, and then contrasting the linguistic and intratextual analyses within their historical and archeological contexts.

kusnierz
Robert Kusnierz is currently a Research Fellow at the Institute of History, Pomeranian University, in Slupsk, Poland. He received his Ph.D. in History in 2004 from the University of Maria Curie-Sklodowska in Lublin. While at Harvard in the fall semester, Kusnierz will study Poland’s attitude toward the Holodomor and the Great Terror in Ukraine (1932–1938) and how these events influenced Polish-Soviet relations.

vushko
Iryna Vushko received her Ph.D. in History from Yale University in 2008 and recently completed a Max Weber Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the European University Institute, San Domenico di Fiesole, Italy. While at Harvard this fall, Vushko will be researching the topic “Enlightened Absolutism, Imperial Bureaucracy, and Provincial Society: The Austrian Project to Transform Galicia, 1772–1815.” Vushko’s work will analyze the Austrian bureaucratic modernization of Galicia between its annexation by the Habsburg monarchy in 1772 and the final settlements of the Congress of Vienna in 1815. The reforms of Austrian Empire bureaucrats in Galicia were meant to replace Polish institutions with new Austrian ones and to forge political loyalty among the local Poles, Ruthenians, and Jews. Rather than promoting uniformity, these actions created new identities and reinforced existing identities that were intended to be suppressed. Indirectly, they gave rise to modern nationalism in Galicia. Vushko will analyze the long-term effects of these eighteenth-century reforms in the transformation of early modern ethnicities into modern nationalities and consequently the emergence of rival national movement in Galicia.

Mihaychuk Fellows

Rostyslav Melnykiv is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ukrainian Literature at the Skovoroda National Pedagogical University of Kharkiv. He received a Kandydat nauk in philology from Kharkiv State University in 1998. His area of interest is Ukrainian literature of the twentieth century, focusing on the 1920s and 1930s. Melnykiv will spend the spring semester at Harvard looking at the models of “ideal literature” and “ideal fiction” that participants in the literary discussions attempted to define. As Melnykiv observes, the origin of dominant aesthetic ideas, their formation, and further transformation are crucial for understanding the intellectual basis of the literary discussions and processes of the 1920s and on the whole.

portnova
Tetyana Portnova is currently a Junior Research Fellow at the Department of Historiography and the Study of Sources and Archives at Dnipropetrovsk National University. She received her Kandydat nauk in history there in 2008. During her fellowship this fall, Portnova plans to research peasantry and peasant culture in Ukrainian public discourse during the second half of the nineteenth century. She will study the social and cultural reasons behind the peasantry’s emergence, the underlying motives for that emergence, and the significance of societal notions about the peasantry for the community in which they functioned. As part of the study, Portnova plans to place the development of the Ukrainian conception of the peasantry into the broader perspective of the national movements of Central and Eastern Europe.

NEXT EVENT

Sep
24

Monday, September 24, 2018 4:30pm - 6:15pm

Book Talk: Ukraine's Quest for Identity: Embracing Cultural Hybridity in Literary Imagination, 1991-2011
Maria G. Rewakowicz, Affiliate Faculty, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Washington; Part-Time Lecturer in German, Russian, and East European Languages and Literatures, Rutgers University - New Brunswick
Room S-050, CGIS South, Harvard University


Full Calendar

WATCH HURI ON YOUTUBE

Copyright © 2018 The President and Fellows of Harvard College

Address: 34 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
Hours of operation: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. EST
Phone: 617-495-4053
Fax: 617-495-8097
E-mail: huri@fas.harvard.edu