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HURI's 2018 Year in Review

HURI building 2018 feature

This past year was a particularly busy and important one for the Institute. With January 22, 2018 marking the 50th anniversary of the establishment of Ukrainian studies at Harvard, it was fitting to reflect on the accomplishments of the past half-century, changes in the field of Ukrainian studies, and ambitions for the future.

Also of particular note this year were several personnel changes. As we welcomed our new manager of publications, Oleh Kotsyuba, we said goodbye to Lubomyr Hajda, who officially retired after more than 50 years of dedicated service to the field and the Institute. 

For more details and highlights from the past year, read the full newsletter here.

HURI Establishes New ASEEES Book Prize in Ukrainian Studies

Pritsak Prize feature

The Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard University is pleased to announce a distinguished new prize that recognizes outstanding works of scholarship on Ukraine. The Omeljan Pritsak Book Prize in Ukrainian Studies was approved by the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES) to join its annual book prize program starting in 2019.

Sponsored by HURI and awarded by an ASEEES-appointed committee, the Pritsak Prize carries a cash award and will be presented annually at the ASEEES Convention. The Institute is grateful to the ASEEES board for considering the proposal and supporting the prize.

HURI hopes the Pritsak Prize will help raise the profile of Ukrainian studies and, by extension, help advance accurate knowledge of Ukraine. Read more.

Хто сьогодні вивчає українську мову в Гарварді

Nini Arshakuni feature

Не секрет, що часто американські студенти, які походять зі Східної Європи, вибирають російську чи українську мови, бо так їм легше одержати необхідні залікові бали («кредити»), адже іноземна мова є тут для них обов'язковим предметом. Цікаво, що саме спонукало Ніні до вивчення української?

НІНІ АРШАКУНІ: «Я вже точно не пам'ятаю, коли я вперше почула українську мову, здається, десь в ранньому дитинстві. Але по-справжньому я закохалася в неї вже в середній школі, коли я почула українські пісні. Тоді на Ютубі я побачила відео деяких пісень гурту «Океан Ельзи», і я була в повному захваті від них. Особливо мене вразила пісня «Відпусти». Але зараз мій список улюблених українських пісень є набагато довшим, і він включає різні жанри, голоси й музичні стилі.

Тому я вирішила скористатися нагодою, яку дає мені Гарвард, і впритул зайнятися українською мовою як усною, так і писемною. Бо тільки так, через мову, можна зрозуміти будь-який народ, його історію, культуру, психологію, прагнення і сподівання.» Далі читайте тут.

Read more HURI news...

Shklar and Mihaychuk Fellows 2009–2010



Shklar Fellows

delapuente
Ines Garcia de la Puente received her doctorate in Slavic philology and Indo-European linguistics from the Complutense University, Madrid, in 2006. Garcia will use her fellowship tenure this fall to focus on the topic “From Kyiv to Rome along the Ladoga: Reassessing Trade Routes in Rus´,” a topic that she began researching in 2008 under a postdoctoral fellowship from the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science. She aims to shed new light on the traditional interpretation of the “route from the Varangians to the Greeks” as described in the Primary Chronicle. She plans to conduct a linguistic analysis of the description of the route in the chronicle, completing an intratextual analysis of the Primary Chronicle, and then contrasting the linguistic and intratextual analyses within their historical and archeological contexts.

kusnierz
Robert Kusnierz is currently a Research Fellow at the Institute of History, Pomeranian University, in Slupsk, Poland. He received his Ph.D. in History in 2004 from the University of Maria Curie-Sklodowska in Lublin. While at Harvard in the fall semester, Kusnierz will study Poland’s attitude toward the Holodomor and the Great Terror in Ukraine (1932–1938) and how these events influenced Polish-Soviet relations.

vushko
Iryna Vushko received her Ph.D. in History from Yale University in 2008 and recently completed a Max Weber Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the European University Institute, San Domenico di Fiesole, Italy. While at Harvard this fall, Vushko will be researching the topic “Enlightened Absolutism, Imperial Bureaucracy, and Provincial Society: The Austrian Project to Transform Galicia, 1772–1815.” Vushko’s work will analyze the Austrian bureaucratic modernization of Galicia between its annexation by the Habsburg monarchy in 1772 and the final settlements of the Congress of Vienna in 1815. The reforms of Austrian Empire bureaucrats in Galicia were meant to replace Polish institutions with new Austrian ones and to forge political loyalty among the local Poles, Ruthenians, and Jews. Rather than promoting uniformity, these actions created new identities and reinforced existing identities that were intended to be suppressed. Indirectly, they gave rise to modern nationalism in Galicia. Vushko will analyze the long-term effects of these eighteenth-century reforms in the transformation of early modern ethnicities into modern nationalities and consequently the emergence of rival national movement in Galicia.

Mihaychuk Fellows

Rostyslav Melnykiv is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ukrainian Literature at the Skovoroda National Pedagogical University of Kharkiv. He received a Kandydat nauk in philology from Kharkiv State University in 1998. His area of interest is Ukrainian literature of the twentieth century, focusing on the 1920s and 1930s. Melnykiv will spend the spring semester at Harvard looking at the models of “ideal literature” and “ideal fiction” that participants in the literary discussions attempted to define. As Melnykiv observes, the origin of dominant aesthetic ideas, their formation, and further transformation are crucial for understanding the intellectual basis of the literary discussions and processes of the 1920s and on the whole.

portnova
Tetyana Portnova is currently a Junior Research Fellow at the Department of Historiography and the Study of Sources and Archives at Dnipropetrovsk National University. She received her Kandydat nauk in history there in 2008. During her fellowship this fall, Portnova plans to research peasantry and peasant culture in Ukrainian public discourse during the second half of the nineteenth century. She will study the social and cultural reasons behind the peasantry’s emergence, the underlying motives for that emergence, and the significance of societal notions about the peasantry for the community in which they functioned. As part of the study, Portnova plans to place the development of the Ukrainian conception of the peasantry into the broader perspective of the national movements of Central and Eastern Europe.

NEXT EVENT

Jan
28

Monday, January 28, 2019

HURI's next Seminar in Ukrainian Studies will take place at the start of the Spring 2019 term. The schedule will be announced in the coming weeks.


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