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Хто сьогодні вивчає українську мову в Гарварді

Nini Arshakuni feature

Не секрет, що часто американські студенти, які походять зі Східної Європи, вибирають російську чи українську мови, бо так їм легше одержати необхідні залікові бали («кредити»), адже іноземна мова є тут для них обов'язковим предметом. Цікаво, що саме спонукало Ніні до вивчення української?

НІНІ АРШАКУНІ: «Я вже точно не пам'ятаю, коли я вперше почула українську мову, здається, десь в ранньому дитинстві. Але по-справжньому я закохалася в неї вже в середній школі, коли я почула українські пісні. Тоді на Ютубі я побачила відео деяких пісень гурту «Океан Ельзи», і я була в повному захваті від них. Особливо мене вразила пісня «Відпусти». Але зараз мій список улюблених українських пісень є набагато довшим, і він включає різні жанри, голоси й музичні стилі.

Тому я вирішила скористатися нагодою, яку дає мені Гарвард, і впритул зайнятися українською мовою як усною, так і писемною. Бо тільки так, через мову, можна зрозуміти будь-який народ, його історію, культуру, психологію, прагнення і сподівання.» Далі читайте тут.

Patricia Herlihy (1930-2018)

Pat Herlihy Odessa feature

With great sadness, HURI shares the news that Patricia Herlihy passed away today, October 24, 2018. Her ambitious scholarship, insightful participation at our seminars, and joyful presence in general will be greatly missed.

A native San Franciscan, Herlihy graduated from the University of California, Berkeley and obtained her PhD in History from the University of Pennsylvania. She authored Odessa: A History 1794-1914 (Harvard University Press. 1987); The Alcoholic Empire: Vodka and Politics in Late Imperial Russia (Oxford University Press, 2002); Vodka: A Global History (Reaktion Books, 2012). She was Professor Emerita at Brown University (2001), Louise Wyant Professor Emerita at Emmanuel College (2009), Adjunct Professor at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs (Brown University), and an Associate at the Ukrainian Research Institute and the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University. Formerly Co-Master (with David Herlihy) of Mather House Harvard University (1976-1986), she has six children and six grandchildren.

Visitation hours will be held on Friday, October 26th from 4:00-8:00pm at Keefe Funeral Home in Cambridge and a funeral Mass will be held on Saturday, October 27th at 10am at St. Paul's Church in Cambridge. Her family has suggested making donations to the ACLU or a charity of your choice, in lieu of flowers.

Our thoughts are with the Herlihy family in this difficult time of mourning. Thank you, Pat, for your work on Odesa and your many years of friendship.

Happy 75th Birthday, George G. Grabowicz!

50th Anniversary GGG feature

The Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard University extends its warmest wishes and heartfelt greetings to George G. Grabowicz on the occasion of his 75th birthday.

Throughout his extensive academic career, Grabowicz has profoundly influenced the development and advancement of Ukrainian studies at Harvard University and the institutional success of HURI. In his work as Dmytro Čyževs’kyj Professor of Ukrainian Literature (since 1983) and Chair of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures (1983-1988), Grabowicz gave the study of Ukrainian literature a seat at the table. While publishing regularly on a plethora of historical topics and individual writers from Ukrainian literature, he deepened the Ukrainian vein in Harvard’s humanities through courses on Ukrainian literature, comparative literature, and comparative Slavic literature.

As a professor, he has mentored, educated, and shaped the next generation of professionals and academics specializing in Ukrainian subject matter. A dynamic presence in the classroom, Grabowicz not only relays his knowledge, but engages his students in rigorous discussion and debate. Read more.

Digenis Akritis: A Border Guard Transcending Borders

Digenes Plate feature

A hybrid of oral epic and literary romance from 12th-century Byzantium, Digenis Akritis has it all: Bride-stealing and romance, bravery and battle, uncanny strength and folkloric anecdotes. While the hero works to safeguard the frontier regions of the empire, his parentage blurs the lines: His father an Arab emir, his mother the daughter of a Byzantine general. Like Digenis, the manuscripts we have today come from varied locales that transcend borders, resulting in several versions with unique features and local flavors.

One such version is the Old Slavic Digenis Akritis, which is at the core of Robert Romanchuk’s current project as a HURI Research Fellow. We sat down with Romanchuk for preliminary insight into his upcoming talk and his research at HURI. The talk, “The Old Slavic Digenis Akritis: Its ‘Formulaic Style’ and the Question of Adaptation or Translation” is at 4:30 pm on Monday, October 15, in Room S-050, CGIS South, Harvard University. All are welcome to attend. Read more.

Shklar and Mihaychuk Fellows 2009–2010



Shklar Fellows

delapuente
Ines Garcia de la Puente received her doctorate in Slavic philology and Indo-European linguistics from the Complutense University, Madrid, in 2006. Garcia will use her fellowship tenure this fall to focus on the topic “From Kyiv to Rome along the Ladoga: Reassessing Trade Routes in Rus´,” a topic that she began researching in 2008 under a postdoctoral fellowship from the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science. She aims to shed new light on the traditional interpretation of the “route from the Varangians to the Greeks” as described in the Primary Chronicle. She plans to conduct a linguistic analysis of the description of the route in the chronicle, completing an intratextual analysis of the Primary Chronicle, and then contrasting the linguistic and intratextual analyses within their historical and archeological contexts.

kusnierz
Robert Kusnierz is currently a Research Fellow at the Institute of History, Pomeranian University, in Slupsk, Poland. He received his Ph.D. in History in 2004 from the University of Maria Curie-Sklodowska in Lublin. While at Harvard in the fall semester, Kusnierz will study Poland’s attitude toward the Holodomor and the Great Terror in Ukraine (1932–1938) and how these events influenced Polish-Soviet relations.

vushko
Iryna Vushko received her Ph.D. in History from Yale University in 2008 and recently completed a Max Weber Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the European University Institute, San Domenico di Fiesole, Italy. While at Harvard this fall, Vushko will be researching the topic “Enlightened Absolutism, Imperial Bureaucracy, and Provincial Society: The Austrian Project to Transform Galicia, 1772–1815.” Vushko’s work will analyze the Austrian bureaucratic modernization of Galicia between its annexation by the Habsburg monarchy in 1772 and the final settlements of the Congress of Vienna in 1815. The reforms of Austrian Empire bureaucrats in Galicia were meant to replace Polish institutions with new Austrian ones and to forge political loyalty among the local Poles, Ruthenians, and Jews. Rather than promoting uniformity, these actions created new identities and reinforced existing identities that were intended to be suppressed. Indirectly, they gave rise to modern nationalism in Galicia. Vushko will analyze the long-term effects of these eighteenth-century reforms in the transformation of early modern ethnicities into modern nationalities and consequently the emergence of rival national movement in Galicia.

Mihaychuk Fellows

Rostyslav Melnykiv is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ukrainian Literature at the Skovoroda National Pedagogical University of Kharkiv. He received a Kandydat nauk in philology from Kharkiv State University in 1998. His area of interest is Ukrainian literature of the twentieth century, focusing on the 1920s and 1930s. Melnykiv will spend the spring semester at Harvard looking at the models of “ideal literature” and “ideal fiction” that participants in the literary discussions attempted to define. As Melnykiv observes, the origin of dominant aesthetic ideas, their formation, and further transformation are crucial for understanding the intellectual basis of the literary discussions and processes of the 1920s and on the whole.

portnova
Tetyana Portnova is currently a Junior Research Fellow at the Department of Historiography and the Study of Sources and Archives at Dnipropetrovsk National University. She received her Kandydat nauk in history there in 2008. During her fellowship this fall, Portnova plans to research peasantry and peasant culture in Ukrainian public discourse during the second half of the nineteenth century. She will study the social and cultural reasons behind the peasantry’s emergence, the underlying motives for that emergence, and the significance of societal notions about the peasantry for the community in which they functioned. As part of the study, Portnova plans to place the development of the Ukrainian conception of the peasantry into the broader perspective of the national movements of Central and Eastern Europe.

NEXT EVENT

Nov
20

Tuesday, November 20, 2018 4:30pm - 6:15pm

*Please note that this seminar is on TUESDAY in HURI's library*
Confronting Health Care in Ukraine: Patients’ Coping Strategies
Olena Levenets, Early Stage Researcher, Department of Law, School of Business and Governance, Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia; Visiting Fellow, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard
Omeljan Pritsak Memorial Library, Ukrainian Research Institute, 34 Kirkland Street, Cambridge


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