New from HURI Publications

On November 21, 2013 HURI launched three new publications at a reception held in conjunction with the annual ASEEES (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies) convention. They became available first for the participants of the convention, and now can be ordered from Harvard University Press.

  • Ukraine under Western Eyes: The Bohdan and Neonila Krawciw Ucrainica Map Collection. Steven Seegel with an introduction by George G. Grabowicz. 2013. 360 pp. Large format cloth w/DVD: ISBN 978-1-932650-04-4, $99.95.
  • The Hustynja Chronicle. Compiled and with an introduction by Oleksiy Tolochko. Harvard Library of Early Ukrainian Literature: Texts, volume XI. 2013, 620 pp. Cloth: ISBN: 978-1-932650-03-7. $79.95.
  • After the Holodomor: The Enduring Impact of the Great Famine on Ukraine. Edited by Andrea Graziosi, Lubomyr A.Hajda, and Halyna Hryn. 2013. 324 pp. Paper: ISBN: 978-1-932650-10-5. $29.95.

 

Ukraine under Western Eyes: The Bohdan and Neonila Krawciw Ucrainica Map Collection. Steven Seegel with an introduction by George G. Grabowicz.

krawciw-map

Cartography encompasses several spheres, including geography, history, political science, literature, and art. From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment, the geopolitical placement of Ukraine drew the attention of some of Europe's most influential cartographers, including Danckerts, de l'Isle, Homann, Robert de Vaugondy, Visscher, and, of course, Beauplan. Many of these maps, including ones of exceptional rarity, were collected by the Ukrainian scholar and journalist Bohdan Krawciw.

Born in Austro-Hungarian Galicia in 1904, Krawciw became a multilingual Ukrainian national activist in interwar Poland, postwar West Germany, and finally in the United States. He traced the physical and aesthetic depiction of Ukraine across its changing borders, as a means of self-recognition and as a cultural and political history of the contested nation and its peoples. Of special interest are his maps of Ukraine from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, at the crossroads of four empires: Habsburg, Ottoman, Russian, and Soviet.

As part of his personal archive, Krawciw's maps were bequeathed to Harvard University upon his death in 1975. This book serves as both a catalog of his collection and a description of how the maps he collected serve as an invaluable source for Ukraine's history and a symbol of Ukrainian national identity. The book contains nearly 100 examples from the collection, many in full color, as well as indices listing maps by cartographer and by place name, and a DVD-ROM containing digital scans of the figures from the book.

The Hustynja Chronicle. Compiled and with an introduction by Oleksiy Tolochko.

hustynja

Written in the early seventeenth century, the Hustynja Chronicle represents the first attempt of early modern chroniclers to write a systematic history of Ukraine. The chronological sweep of the text is ambitious, describing the history of Kyivan Rus´ and Ukraine from biblical times until the Union of Brest in 1596. The text covers many critical periods in Ukrainian history, including pre-Mongol Rus´, the expansion of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, and the emergence of the Cossacks. Its unique style blends the older tradition of presenting information under yearly entries with a newer, more narrative style of chronicle modeled on the works of Polish chroniclers such as Stryjkowski and Bielski.

This publication marks the first time that the Hustynja Chronicle has appeared in a scholarly edition. One copy originally found in the Mharsk Monastery serves as the exemplar for the main text, and is accompanied by notes representing variants from six other copies of the text. An introduction by Ukrainian historian Dr. Oleksiy Tolochko, given both in the original Ukrainian and English translation, provides a detailed description and history of the chronicle.

This volume is the eleventh in the Harvard Library of Early Ukrainian Literature: Texts series, which publishes facsimiles and scholarly editions of texts central to the study of early Ukrainian history, philology, and literature. The Hustynja Chronicle is an essential source for scholars interested in medieval and early-modern Ukrainian history, philology, and chronicle writing.

After the Holodomor: The Enduring Impact of the Great Famine on Ukraine. Edited by Andrea Graziosi, Lubomyr A.Hajda, and Halyna Hryn.

after-holodomor

Over the last twenty years, a concerted effort has been made to uncover the history of the Great Famine (Holodomor) of 1932–33 in Ukraine. Now, with the archives opened and the essential story told, it becomes possible to explore in detail what happened after the Holodomor—to examine its impact on Ukraine and its people.

In 2008 the Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard University hosted an international conference entitled "The Great Famine in Ukraine: The Holodomor and Its Consequences, 1933 to the Present." The papers, most of which are contained in this volume, concern a wide range of topics, such as the immediate aftermath of the Holodomor and its subsequent effect on Ukraine's people and communities; World War II, with its wartime and postwar famines; and the impact of the Holodomor on subsequent generations of Ukrainians and present-day Ukrainian culture. Through the efforts of the historians, archivists, and demographers represented here, a fuller history of the Holodomor continues to emerge.

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