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Diverse Group of Students United by Interest in Ukraine: HUSI 2018

HUSI 2018 feature

On Monday, June 25, 2018, students took their first classes of the 48th annual Harvard Ukrainian Summer Institute. At the opening reception later that day, our students had a chance to meet one another and get to know the faculty and staff.

This year, we’re thrilled to welcome 14 talented students to Harvard for an intensive summer session. One of HUSI’s best attributes is its ability to bring together a skilled group of individuals with many interests, backgrounds, and ambitions. This year certainly lives up to that expectation, promising to foster insightful conversations and lifelong ties.

We invite the entire Harvard community and the wider public to join in this experience by attending our public HUSI lectures, which are listed on our Events Calendar. Check HURI’s website for updates and additions to this schedule. Read on to meet some of the students.

Holodomor: Newly Mapped Data Leads to New Insights

Nataliia presentation HURI

During the Spring 2018 term, the MAPA team added new variables to the Great Famine web map at the raion level, allowing for a much more nuanced analysis. The new data effectively tripled the number of map layers available in the MAPA atlas for researchers to use, includes population statistics, such as rural population density and ethnic structure; economic indicators, such as grain procurement quotas, planned grain quotas, actual grain quotas, and percentage of fulfillment; geographical information about wheat crops, such as the percentage of land used for wheat, the percentage of crop area owned by independent farmers, collective, or state farms; and collectivization rates.

With these resources in the Famine web map, researchers and other MAPA users can see a more fine-tuned representation of how famine losses varied throughout Ukraine and explore which factors were significant causes of starvation in specific areas. Read this article to learn more about the new resources and the MAPA team's research.

Голодомор: нові дані ведуть до нових відкриттів і знахідок

Під час 2017-2018-го навчального року в Інституті працювала демограф Наталя Левчук з Інституту демографії та соціальних досліджень ім. М. В. Птухи НАН України. Упродовж тривалого часу вона є співробітником картографічного проекту «Мапа», і цього разу вона також займалася підготовкою статистичних даних та розробкою цифрових інтерактивних карт. В результаті Н. Левчук привнесла сюди багато нової наукової інформації. Демографи, так само, як і історики, активно працюють над створенням «Мапи», і це робить її справді унікальним науковим проектом. Далі читайте тут.

Директори УНІГУ про Свої Плани та Досягнення: Сергій Плохій

50th Anniversary Serhii Plokhii feature

Ми поставили кілька питань Сергію Плохію як теперішньому директору Українського наукового інституту Гарвардського університету:Як нинішній керівник Інституту як Ви особисто формулюєте для себе ті пріоритети та завдання, над якими мусить працювати УНІГУ? Які з цих цілей Вам вже вдалося досягти? Які перешкоди Ви мусили для того подолати? І що, на Вашу думку, може вважатися Вашим найбільшим досягненням на цій посаді?

Відповідаючи на них, Сергій Плохій сказав, що в його випадку, мабуть, трохи зарано казати про досягнення чи невдачі. Але на конференції, присвяченій 50-тій річниці заснування українознавчих досліджень у Гарварді (11 – 12 травня 2018 року), він досить детально зупинився на змінах, які за півстоліття зазнала ця галузь гуманістики й на тих темах і проблемах, над якими зараз працює УНІГУ. Подаємо стислий виклад його доповіді. Далі читайте тут.

Richard Pipes, longtime friend and supporter of the Institute (1923-2018)

220px Richard Pipes 2004

It is with sadness that HURI received news of Richard Pipes's death on May 17, 2018. A longtime friend and supporter of the Institute, Pipes was a former graduate student and Professor Emeritus of the History Department at Harvard University. A brief biography and information about tomorrow's funeral services, shared by his son Daniel, follows.

Richard Pipes, the Frank B Baird, Jr Professor of History, Emeritus, at Harvard University, born July 11, 1923, died this morning, May 17, in the Boston area. Born in Poland, Professor Pipes arrived in the United States as a refugee from the Nazis in 1940. He served in U.S. Army Air Corps, where he learned Russian, and entered Harvard as a graduate student in 1946, staying at the university until his retirement in 1996. His speciality was imperial Russian history and the Russian Revolution; he trained thousands of undergraduates and dozens of doctoral students. He was also active in formulating and executing US policy toward the Soviet Union, heading the Team B Project (sponsored by President Gerald Ford), which assessed the military capabilities of the USSR in 1976, and serving for two years, 1981-83, on President Ronald Reagan’s White House National Security Council. He is survived by his wife, Irene, two children, and four grandchildren.

A graveside service will be held tomorrow, Friday, May 18, at 1:00 pm at Section B, Lot 189 at the Beth Israel Memorial Park, 190 South St, Waltham, MA 02453. If you plan to attend, please come 15-30 minutes in advance and note that there are no facilities at the graveside.

Shklar and Mihaychuk Fellows 2009–2010



Shklar Fellows

delapuente
Ines Garcia de la Puente received her doctorate in Slavic philology and Indo-European linguistics from the Complutense University, Madrid, in 2006. Garcia will use her fellowship tenure this fall to focus on the topic “From Kyiv to Rome along the Ladoga: Reassessing Trade Routes in Rus´,” a topic that she began researching in 2008 under a postdoctoral fellowship from the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science. She aims to shed new light on the traditional interpretation of the “route from the Varangians to the Greeks” as described in the Primary Chronicle. She plans to conduct a linguistic analysis of the description of the route in the chronicle, completing an intratextual analysis of the Primary Chronicle, and then contrasting the linguistic and intratextual analyses within their historical and archeological contexts.

kusnierz
Robert Kusnierz is currently a Research Fellow at the Institute of History, Pomeranian University, in Slupsk, Poland. He received his Ph.D. in History in 2004 from the University of Maria Curie-Sklodowska in Lublin. While at Harvard in the fall semester, Kusnierz will study Poland’s attitude toward the Holodomor and the Great Terror in Ukraine (1932–1938) and how these events influenced Polish-Soviet relations.

vushko
Iryna Vushko received her Ph.D. in History from Yale University in 2008 and recently completed a Max Weber Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the European University Institute, San Domenico di Fiesole, Italy. While at Harvard this fall, Vushko will be researching the topic “Enlightened Absolutism, Imperial Bureaucracy, and Provincial Society: The Austrian Project to Transform Galicia, 1772–1815.” Vushko’s work will analyze the Austrian bureaucratic modernization of Galicia between its annexation by the Habsburg monarchy in 1772 and the final settlements of the Congress of Vienna in 1815. The reforms of Austrian Empire bureaucrats in Galicia were meant to replace Polish institutions with new Austrian ones and to forge political loyalty among the local Poles, Ruthenians, and Jews. Rather than promoting uniformity, these actions created new identities and reinforced existing identities that were intended to be suppressed. Indirectly, they gave rise to modern nationalism in Galicia. Vushko will analyze the long-term effects of these eighteenth-century reforms in the transformation of early modern ethnicities into modern nationalities and consequently the emergence of rival national movement in Galicia.

Mihaychuk Fellows

Rostyslav Melnykiv is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ukrainian Literature at the Skovoroda National Pedagogical University of Kharkiv. He received a Kandydat nauk in philology from Kharkiv State University in 1998. His area of interest is Ukrainian literature of the twentieth century, focusing on the 1920s and 1930s. Melnykiv will spend the spring semester at Harvard looking at the models of “ideal literature” and “ideal fiction” that participants in the literary discussions attempted to define. As Melnykiv observes, the origin of dominant aesthetic ideas, their formation, and further transformation are crucial for understanding the intellectual basis of the literary discussions and processes of the 1920s and on the whole.

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Tetyana Portnova is currently a Junior Research Fellow at the Department of Historiography and the Study of Sources and Archives at Dnipropetrovsk National University. She received her Kandydat nauk in history there in 2008. During her fellowship this fall, Portnova plans to research peasantry and peasant culture in Ukrainian public discourse during the second half of the nineteenth century. She will study the social and cultural reasons behind the peasantry’s emergence, the underlying motives for that emergence, and the significance of societal notions about the peasantry for the community in which they functioned. As part of the study, Portnova plans to place the development of the Ukrainian conception of the peasantry into the broader perspective of the national movements of Central and Eastern Europe.

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